Experiments in self-assessment

This semester, I’ve been experimenting with self-assessment. Students in my undergraduate 4000-level online course submit weekly self-assessments in which they fill out a chart proposing the number of points they think they’ve earned on their activities that week and they write a paragraph-long reflection of what they’ve learned and how they plan to improve. So …

What happens when you replace grades with a set of requirements?

This weekend the NYT had a story about an alternative assessment model called mastery-based learning: “A New Kind of Classroom: No Grades, No Failing, No Hurry.” Here’s how the article describes it: At M.S. 442, students are encouraged to focus instead on mastering a set of grade-level skills, like writing a scientific hypothesis or identifying …

Empathy and education

Day 3 of the Introduction to Digital Pedagogies (#dplintro) strand explored the roles of listening and empathy within teaching. It was a logical progression from a heart-wrenching keynote earlier by Dr. Sara Goldrick-Rab (@saragoldrickrab) about college students’ struggles to meet their basic needs and the social justice imperatives behind affordable higher education (here she is …

K-12 tech integration versus higher ed: Flipped?

Just a quick thought… In K-12, we struggle with access. Most schools are trying to get more technology into their classrooms. It’s not a given yet that students will have regular access to digital tools and adequate bandwidth in their learning spaces. That said, most schools have expectations of teachers that they will integrate technology …

Reflection on day 1 at DPL Vancouver

Our introductory session in the “Open” group focused on the use and creation of open educational resources (OERs), as well as current economic pressures surrounding higher education. I had previously thought that OERs were essentially free, online textbooks — similar in form and content to more traditionally published textbooks. This morning’s session clued me in …