The Digital Pedagogy Lab (#digped) is off to a rolling start. Day 1 (for me) in the Introduction to Digital Pedagogy strand (#dplintro) was full of eye-opening moments, starting with our discussion of how we define Critical Digital Pedagogy. My own definition, which I tweeted (part of the assignment), was “My Critical Dig. Pedagogy is: democratizing, anti-oppressive teaching praxis. Learning by questioning, resisting & sharing #digped”
The omission of tech was not accidental. As you can see from the image, our notions of critical pedagogy were a lot clearer than those of “digital,” with the latter alternating between utopian and dystopian notions of technology’s role in education.
Our discussion closed without a fixed definition, but with some agreement around the notion that technological tools should never dictate teaching practice, but should instead be leveraged in service of dialogic, humanizing, and reflexive teaching.
 

Categories: DigPed 2017

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Posts

DigPed 2017

Join the “Hacking Assessment” book club

Are you interested in thinking about how to spend more time on student feedback and less on assigning and justifying grades? Please consider joining the Thinq.Studio book club for Hacking Assessment: 10 Ways to Go Read more…

DigPed 2017

It’s hard to learn while hungry

As Luis Poza mentioned in his earlier post, the Digital Pedagogy Lab in Fredericksburg, Virginia featured a keynote by Sara Goldrick-Rab, who researches college affordability and the very real needs of our students. Dr. Goldrick-Rab encourages Read more…

DigPed 2017

What happens when you replace grades with a set of requirements?

This weekend the NYT had a story about an alternative assessment model called mastery-based learning: “A New Kind of Classroom: No Grades, No Failing, No Hurry.” Here’s how the article describes it: At M.S. 442, Read more…